2018-19 Departmental Plan

International Standard Serial Number: 2371-6886

Canadian Grain Commission

The Honourable Lawrence MacAulay
Privy Councillor, Member of Parliament,
Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Minister's message

The Honourable Lawrence MacAulay, Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

The Canadian Grain Commission’s 2018–19 Departmental Plan provides parliamentarians and Canadians with information on the objectives and the results we are trying to achieve during the upcoming year. To improve reporting to Canadians, we are introducing a new, simplified report

The report has been restructured to tell a more straightforward story of the Canadian Grain Commission’s Core Responsibility and goals for 2018-19. We will continue to provide transparency on how the Canadian Grain Commission’s resources will be allocated to deliver its key results.

As Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food, my goal is to support the agriculture sector in a way that allows it to be a source of job creation and innovation. My mandate letter sets out sector-specific priorities that include helping the sector get products to markets, research and innovation, food safety, and support for exporters. Canada’s global reputation as a supplier of grain that is consistent in quality and safety is thanks, in large part, to the work of the Canadian Grain Commission.

Going forward, a key priority of the Canadian Grain Commission is to continue efforts to provide innovative programs and services that meet the needs of the grain sector and enhance market access for Canadian grain exports. Delivering clear benefits to farmers and adding value to the sector in the future will be a priority for utilizing the organization’s accumulated surplus in 2018-19 and beyond.

I look forward to working with the Canadian Grain Commission to keep Canada's agricultural sector innovative and prosperous, to achieve the government’s goal of achieving $75 billion in agricultural exports by 2025, and to deliver clear and tangible results for Canadians.

The Honourable Lawrence MacAulay,
Privy Councillor, Member of Parliament,
Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Chief Commissioner's message

Chief Commissioner, Patti Miller

As Chief Commissioner, I am so proud of the work we do at the Canadian Grain Commission to benefit Canadian grain farmers, the grain sector, and, ultimately, all Canadians. I am excited to share our Departmental Plan for 2018-19 to deliver clear results to a dynamic, competitive and efficient grain sector while meeting our mandate under the Canada Grain Act.

In all that we do, we are guided by our Core Responsibility to regulate grain handling in Canada and to establish and maintain standards of quality for Canadian grain.

Canada’s Grain Quality Assurance System has a reputation for being the best in the world because customers trust Canadian grain will consistently meet their evolving needs for quality, safety and quantity. We work with Canada’s grain sector to establish and maintain science-based quality standards, providing value to Canadian grain farmers and the entire grain sector.

A sector that is consistently growing and changing offers valuable opportunities for us to innovate and re-invest in our programs and services and the Canadian grain sector. By setting key priorities and capitalizing on these innovation opportunities, we intend to continue as a leader in grain science.

Patti Miller
Chief Commissioner
Canadian Grain Commission

Plans at a glance

The Canadian Grain Commission regulates grain handling in Canada, and establishes and maintains science based standards for Canadian grain. The Departmental Results of this Core Responsibility are that domestic and international markets regard Canadian grain as dependable and safe and that farmers are fairly compensated for their grain.

The Canadian Grain Commission is committed to working in close collaboration with grain sector stakeholdersFootnote 1, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, central agencies and other domestic and foreign government entities to deliver upon its Core Responsibility and Departmental Results.

The majority of Canadian Grain Commission resources are dedicated to consistent day-to-day delivery of efficient, effective, and sustainable programs and services to deliver upon its mandate and achieve its Departmental Results. However, in recent years, the Canadian grain sector has experienced a period of significant transformation. To ensure that the Canadian Grain Commission’s programs and services continually meet the evolving needs of farmers and the grain sector, it has dedicated resources to specialized projects designed to achieve initiatives identified within its key priorities.

The following priorities support the Canadian Grain Commission’s Core Responsibility and achievement of its planned results for 2018-19:

Strengthening the quality and dependability reputation of Canadian grain

The Canadian Grain Commission is committed to strengthening the quality and dependability reputation of Canadian grain. The Canadian Grain Commission will address this priority by adapting Canada’s grain quality assurance system and responding to the needs of a rapidly evolving grain sector through continued modernization of regulations, policies, programs and procedures.

Innovating Canadian Grain Commission programs, services, and the regulatory framework

To meet the evolving needs of the grain sector, the Canadian Grain Commission is committed to futher innovating its programs, services, and regulatory framework. Moving forward with this priority requires the Canadian Grain Commission to reinvest in its facilities and infrastructure, and use opportunities to implement technological innovation to continue as a grain science and quality assurance leader.

Providing technical guidance to enhance market access for Canadian grain exports

The Canadian Grain Commission is committed to providing technical guidance to enhance market access for Canadian grain exports. Enhancing market access for Canadian grain exports requires the utilization of the Canadian Grain Commission’s technical expertise, access to extensive grain samples, and information to address heightened market sensitivities.

Communicating the value of Canadian Grain Commission programs and services

The Canadian Grain Commission is committed to communicating the value of its programs and services to stakeholders. The Canadian Grain Commission will demonstrate to stakeholders that the impact and contributions of the organization to the grain sector will further enhance services to provide value going forward.

For more information on the Canadian Grain Commission’s plans, priorities and planned results, see the Planned results section of this report.

Planned results: what we want to achieve this year and beyond

Core Responsibilities

Grain Regulation

Description

The Canadian Grain Commission regulates grain handling in Canada, and establishes and maintains science-based standards for Canadian grain.

Planning highlights

The planned results of the Canadian Grain Commission’s Grain Regulation Core Responsibility are that domestic and international markets regard Canadian grain as dependable and safe and that farmers are fairly compensated for their grain. The day-to-day delivery of programs and services is in accordance with the Canada Grain Act. Key initiatives, activities, and actions the Canadian Grain Commission plans to take to achieve these results are:

Strengthening the quality and dependability reputation of Canadian grain

The Canadian Grain Commission will achieve this by modernizing the grain grading system and wheat classes; assessing the vessel loading methodologies to ensure quality and dependability reputation of Canadian grain; improving the understanding of use, value, and access to export services for grain buyers and exporters; and assessing and refining regulatory coverage.

Innovating Canadian Grain Commission programs, services, and regulatory framework

The Canadian Grain Commission will achieve this by re-investing in its facilities and infrastructure to support innovative programs and services; strengthening technological innovation of information management systems and assessing scientific analytical methods and technologies; and modernizing the Canadian Grain Commission’s regulatory framework.

Providing technical guidance to enhance market access for Canadian grain exports

The Canadian Grain Commission will achieve this by integrating technical expertise and information to mitigate market access issues for Canadian grain exports; enhancing grain monitoring activities; and integrating evidence based international and domestic feedback and analytics to optimize market access for grain exports.

Communicating the value of Canadian Grain Commission programs and services

The Canadian Grain Commission will achieve this by supporting programs and services valued by the sector; enhancing accessibility and speed of analytical services; enhancing producer payment protection; and strengthening effective communication with stakeholders about its programs and services and their value.

These initiatives and activities are guided by a focus on achieving the Departmental Results outlined in the Departmental Results Framework. As the Canadian Grain Commission is early in the implementation stages of its new framework, for 2018-19 it is focussed on tracking and analyzing performance information to ensure that the expected results are achieved. This includes conducting public opinion research and investigating options to enhance producer payment protection. Associated performance indicators, targets, and past results are reflected in the Planned results table in this section.

The 2017 Evaluation of the Harvest Sample Program concluded that there was a significant need for the program to continue. The Canadian Grain Commission continues to address recommendations made in the evaluation by enhancing the efficiency and relevancy of the Harvest Sample Program by providing timelier results to participants and improving harvest quality information. The Canadian Grain Commission’s Grain Research Program manages the Harvest Sample Program. The evaluation report is on the Canadian Grain Commission’s website.

Planned results for the Canadian Grain Commission’s Core Responsibility of Grain Regulation do not affect the government-wide priorities of gender equality, diversity and inclusiveness. However, the Canadian Grain Commission contributes to these priorities by incorporating gender-based analysis plus into its employment equity and diversity goals and framework. The Gender-based analysis plus supplementary information table details these initiatives.

The Canadian Grain Commission has identified 3 key corporate risks and one key corporate opportunity that could have an impact on carrying out activities under the Grain Regulation Core Responsibility. These risks are the following:

  • the ability to ensure Canadian grain is dependable and safe while balancing rapidly evolving grain sector needs
  • aging infrastructure, equipment, and technology
  • the capacity to respond to opportunities while delivering upon the core mandate

The Canadian Grain Commission’s key corporate opportunity is to collaborate with stakeholders to effectively and efficiently deliver Departmental Results and promote the value of its programs and services.

Current internal and external factors identify the Canadian Grain Commission’s key risks and risk response strategies for the 2018-19 fiscal year. The key risks and risk response strategies are on the Canadian Grain Commission’s website.

Grain Regulation Core Responsibility planned spending is $5,261,833Footnote 2 and planned full-time equivalents is 309 for the 2018-19 fiscal year. Further Core Responsibility spending information is available in the Spending and human resources section of this report.

Experimentation

In alignment with the government’s new evidence-based approaches to achieve planned results and address problems that traditional approaches have been unable to solve, the Canadian Grain Commission has identified an area of innovation and experimentation for the organization.

In response to the increasing need for grain quality monitoring and pressures to modernize its grading system to include the objective assessment of grains, the Canadian Grain Commission investigated the feasibility of providing onsite analytical services at a terminal elevator in 2017-18. This pilot project took place at a Pacific Coast grain terminal and included analytical testing of deoxynivalenol (DON), also known as vomitoxin, and falling number testingFootnote 3 during vessel loading resulting in the provision of real-time quantitative results to clients. In 2018-19, the Canadian Grain Commission will assess conclusions and recommendations documented by the project and determine whether to implement onsite analytical services more broadly.

The analytical services pilot project budget is $130,104 and the anticipated completion date is April 30, 2018. Existing staff conducted pilot project testing, incurring no additional staffing resources.

Planned results
Departmental Results Departmental Result Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2014–15 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results 2016-17 Actual results
Domestic and international markets regard Canadian grain as dependable and safe Percentage of stakeholders who regard Canadian grain as dependable and safe TBDFootnote 4 TBDFootnote 5 Not availableFootnote 6 Not availableFootnote 6 Not availableFootnote 6
Value of Canadian grain exports $30.6 billionFootnote 7 April 2025Footnote 8 $25.1 billionFootnote 9 $26.1 billionFootnote 10 $25.5 billionFootnote 11
Farmers are fairly compensated of their grain Percentage of sales where farmers are compensated for their grain 100% April 2019 100% 99.99% 100%
Percentage of outstanding liabilities paid to farmers in the event of a default by a Canadian Grain Commission licensed grain company 100%Footnote 12 April 2019 No company defaultsFootnote 13 14.21%Footnote 13 Footnote 14 No company defaultsFootnote 13
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018–19 Main Estimates 2018–19 Planned spendingFootnote 15 2019–20 Planned spendingFootnote 15 2020–21 Planned spendingFootnote 15
5,261,833 5,261,833 5,261,833 5,369,169
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents 2020–21 Planned full-time equivalents
309 309 309

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Canadian Grain Commission’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018–19 Main Estimates 2018–19 Planned spendingFootnote 15 2019–20 Planned spendingFootnote 15 2020–21 Planned spendingFootnote 15
245,000 245,000 245,000 245,000
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents 2020–21 Planned full-time equivalents
111 111 111

Further detail on Internal Services’ spending is available in the Spending and human resources section of this report.

Planning highlights

Internal Services are enabling activities and resources that apply across the organization to support and enable delivery of the Canadian Grain Commission’s Core Responsibility and programs. During the 2018-19 fiscal year, a key focus will be to provide support and services for the priorities and key initiatives identified in the Plans at a glance section of this report.

The Canadian Grain Commission uses the annual Management Accountability Framework assessment feedback to identify organizational strengths and priorities going forward, as well as potential management priorities. As required under the Policy on Results, the Canadian Grain Commission’s Departmental Results Framework, Program Inventory, and Performance Information Profiles will be effective in the 2018-19 fiscal year. The Canadian Grain Commission’s program evaluation function will continue executing its multi-year plan in 2018-19. The Canadian Grain Commission is looking at enhancing its program evaluation function, and to date one program has been formally evaluatedFootnote 16. Resources continue to be re-allocated to support the government’s priority to address pay issues and stabilize the Phoenix pay system. The Pay Integration Unit provides support to employees who have complex or untimely pay issues and supports the resolution of larger scale problems affecting employee pay.

The Canadian Grain Commission will update information management technology focussed on improved client service and science. It will also continue to re-invest in technology for mandatory Government of Canada corporate initiatives including enhancements to the recently implemented Systems, Applications & Products (SAP), and My Government of Canada Human Resources (MyGCHR).

As of March 31, 2017, approximately 26.1% of the Canadian Grain Commission workforce will be eligible to retire in 5 years or less. To prevent loss of institutional knowledge, the Canadian Grain Commission continually identifies key positions for succession planning and develops comprehensive recruitment and retention strategies.

Spending and human resources

Planned spending

Departmental spending trend graph

Departmental Spending Trend Graph details below
Departmental Spending Trend, text version
Departmental Spending Trend (thousands of dollars)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 2020-21
Statutory -26,230 -25,322 3,417 660 660 660
Voted 5,021 4,748 5,406 4,847 4,847 4,954
Total -21,209 -20,547 8,823 5,507 5,507 5,614

Note: Statutory amount contains employee benefits plan funding and the net of respendable revenues

Budgetary planning summary for Core Responsibility and Internal Services (dollars)
Core Responsibility and Internal Services 2015–16 ExpendituresFootnote 17 2016–17 ExpendituresFootnote 17 2017–18 Forecast spendingFootnote 18 2018–19 Main Estimates 2018–19 Planned spendingFootnote 18 2019–20 Planned spendingFootnote 18 2020–21 Planned spendingFootnote 18
Grain Regulation (37,208,354) (38,385,249) (11,095,153) 5,261,833 5,261,833 5,261,833 5,369,169
Subtotal (37,208,354) (38,385,249) (11,095,153) 5,261,833 5,261,833 5,261,833 5,369,169
Internal Services 15,999,211 17,812,262 19,918,234 245,000 245,000 245,000 245,000
Total (21,209,143) (20,572,987) 8,823,081 5,506,833 5,506,833 5,506,833 5,614,169

Canadian Grain Commission revenues are dependent on annual grain volumes that can fluctuate considerably from year-to-year, and are not fully known prior to the start of the fiscal year. This can result in significant variances between projected and actual revenues. Canadian Grain Commission costs are less dependent on annual grain volumes and crop quality compared to revenues.

The 2013-2018 fee and revenue projections were based on a funding model that used a historical average grain volume of 23.253 million metric tonnes to forecast revenue projections. However, actual 2015-16 and 2016-17 grain volumes were 38.428 and 37.560 million metric tonnes, respectively, compared to projected grain volumes of 23.253 million metric tonnes. As a result, revolving fund surpluses of $26.810 million in 2015-16 and $25.902 million in 2016-17 occurred, leading to a total accumulated surplus of $121.789 million as of March 31, 2017.

Beginning in 2018-19, the Canadian Grain Commission will implement a new funding model that uses an updated time-series analysis model for forecasting annual grain volumes and revenue projections. Annual grain volumes of approximately 34.400 million metric tonnes are projected over the next 5 years. The previous model, which used historical average annual grain volumes to forecast annual revenue projections, was replaced because higher than projected annual grain volumes over the past several years led to total revolving fund revenue being higher than forecasted. The Canadian Grain Commission is anticipating that the updated time series model will mitigate the risk of accumulation of additional surplus in its revolving fund and better align fees with the cost of administering programs and providing services.

The 2017 User Fees Consultation and Pre-Proposal Notification proposed fee decreases for all but 2 Canadian Grain Commission fees as of April 1, 2018 based on the grain volume forecasting methodology. On August 1, 2017, reduced fees for official inspection and weighing came into effect. The early reduction in fees was an additional step to mitigate the risk of further accumulation of surplus funds. Further fee updates are planned for April 2018 to better align revenues and costs and to factor in projected increases in grain volumes inspected and weighed by the Canadian Grain Commission. The Canadian Grain Commission plans to recover approximately 92% of its costs through fees. A priority is to utilize the additional surplus in the revolving fund in 2018-19 and beyond to deliver clear benefits to farmers and meet the needs of the grain sector.

2018–19 Budgetary planned gross spending summary (dollars)
Core Responsibility and Internal Services 2018–19 Planned gross spending 2018–19 Planned gross spending in specified purpose accounts 2018–19 Planned revenues netted against expenditures 2018–19 Planned net spending
Grain Regulation 44,960,425 0 39,698,592 5,261,833
Subtotal 44,960,425 0 39,698,592 5,261,833
Internal Services 17,672,831 0 17,427,831 245,000
Total 62,633,256 0 57,126,423 5,506,833

The Canadian Grain Commission’s revenue projections for 2018-19 and beyond are based on the funding model identified in the Canadian Grain Commission’s 2017 User Fees Consultation and Pre-proposal Notification, issued on March 1, 2017 and fees pre-published in the Canada Gazette, Part I in December 2017. This includes annual grain volume projections of 34.400 million metric tonnes and fees as set out in Schedule I to the Canada Grain Regulations.

Planned human resources

Human resources planning summary for Core Responsibility and Internal Services (full-time equivalents)
Core Responsibility and Internal Services 2015–16 Actual 2016–17 Actual 2017–18 Forecast 2018-19 Planned 2019-20 Planned 2020-21 Planned
Grain Regulation 304 316 323 309 309 309
Subtotal 304 316 323 309 309 309
Internal Services 91 110 116 111 111 111
Total 395 426 439 420 420 420

Planned full-time equivalents for 2017-18 was 404. Forecast full-time equivalents for 2017-18 is 439. The increase is primarily due to staffing required for investing in infrastructure and technology, addressing pay issues arising from the Phoenix pay system, and enhancing the Grain Research Laboratory harvest survey and grain safety as identified in the 2016-17 Departmental Results Report.

Estimates by vote

For information on the Canadian Grain Commission’s organizational appropriations, consult the 2018–19 Main Estimates.

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations

The Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations provides a general overview of the Canadian Grain Commission’s operations. The forecast of financial information on expenses and revenues is prepared on an accrual accounting basis to strengthen accountability and to improve transparency and financial management.

Because the Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations is prepared on an accrual accounting basis, and the forecast and planned spending amounts presented in other sections of the Departmental Plan are prepared on an expenditure basis, amounts may differ.

A more detailed Future-Oriented Statement of Operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net cost of operations to the requested authorities, are available on the Canadian Grain Commission’s website.

Future Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations for the year ended March 31, 2019 (dollars)
Financial information 2017–18 Forecast results 2018–19 Planned results Difference (2018–19 Planned results minus 2017–18 Forecast results)
Total expenses 63,044,126 61,429,995 (1,614,131)
Total revenues 65,320,063 57,126,423 (8,193,640)
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers (2,275,937) 4,303,572 6,579,509

The 2018-19 net cost of operations before government funding is projected to be $4.304 million, a net difference of $6.580 million.

Total expenses

2018-19 total expenses are planned to be $61.430 million, a decrease of $1.614 million over the 2017-18 forecasted expenditures of $63.044 million. This is primarily due to higher strategic investment in infrastructure and equipment in 2017-18.

Total revenues

2018-19 total revenues are planned to be $57.126 million, a decrease of $8.194 million compared to 2017-18 forecasted revenue of $65.320 million. The decrease is primarily due to a reduction of fees for official inspection and weighing services that came into effect August 1, 2017.

Supplementary information

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Appropriate minister[s]: The Honourable Lawrence MacAulay, P.C., M.P.

Institutional head: Patti Miller

Ministerial portfolio: Agriculture and Agri-Food

Enabling instrument: Canada Grain Act

Year of incorporation/commencement: 1912

Other: The Canadian Grain Commission’s head office is located in Winnipeg, Manitoba. The Canadian Grain Commission operates 2 regional offices and 8 service centres, and provides service at more than 30 terminal elevator service delivery points across Canada. Canadian Grain Commission programs and activities are funded through a combination of revolving fund (fees) and appropriation sources. The Canadian Grain Commission plans to recover approximately 92% of its costs through fees.

Raison d’être, mandate and role

Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do is available on the Canadian Grain Commission’s website.

Operating context and key risks

Information on Operating context and key risks is available on the Canadian Grain Commission’s website.

Reporting framework

The below table outlines the Canadian Grain Commission’s Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory of record for 2018–19.

Departmental Results Framework Core Responsibility: Grain Regulation Internal Services
Departmental Result: Domestic and international markets regard Canadian grain as dependable and safe Indicator: Percentage of stakeholders who regard Canadian grain as dependable and safe
Indicator: Value of Canadian grain exports
Departmental Result: Farmers are fairly compensated for their grain Indicator: Percentage of sales where farmers are compensated for their grain
Indicator: Percentage of outstanding liabilities paid to farmers in the event of a default by a Canadian Grain Commission licensed grain company
Program Inventory Program: Grain Quality
Program: Grain Research
Program: Safeguards for Grain Farmers
Concordance between the Departmental Results Framework and the Program Inventory, 2018–19, and the Program Alignment Architecture, 2017–18
2018–19 Core Responsibilities and Program Inventory 2017–18 Lowest-level Program of the Program Alignment Architecture Percentage of lowest-level Program Alignment Architecture program (dollars) corresponding to the new Program in the Program Inventory
Grain Regulation
Grain Quality 1.1 Quality Assurance Program 100%
1.2 Quantity Assurance Program 100%
1.4.3 Producer Support Programs 5%
Grain Research 1.3 Grain Quality Research Program 100%
Safeguards for Grain Farmers 1.4.1 Licensing and Security Program 100%
1.4.2 Producer Car Allocation Program 100%
1.4.3 Producer Support Programs 95%

Supporting information on the Program Inventory

Supporting information on planned expenditures, human resources, and results related to the Canadian Grain Commission’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on the Canadian Grain Commission’s website:

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures. This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

Canadian Grain Commission
600-303 Main Street
Winnipeg, Manitoba R3C 3G8

Telephone: 204-984-0506

Toll free: 1-800-853-6705

Facsimile: 204-983-2751

Teletypewriter (TTY, toll free): 1-866-317-4289

Email: contact@grainscanada.gc.ca

Appendix: definitions

appropriation
(crédit): Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures
(dépenses budgétaires): Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
Core Responsibility
(responsabilité essentielle): An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a Core Responsibility are reflected in one or more related Departmental Results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.
Departmental Plan
(Plan ministériel): A report on the plans and expected performance of appropriated departments over a three year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.
Departmental Result
(résultat ministériel): Any change or changes that the department seeks to influence. A Departmental Result is often outside departments’ immediate control, but it should be influenced by Program-level outcomes.
Departmental Result Indicator
(indicateur de résultat ministériel): A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a Departmental Result.
Departmental Results Framework
(cadre ministériel des résultats): The department’s Core Responsibilities, Departmental Results and Departmental Result Indicators.
Departmental Results Report
(Rapport sur les résultats ministériels): A report on the actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.
experimentation
(expérimentation): Activities that seek to explore, test and compare the effects and impacts of policies, interventions and approaches, to inform evidence-based decision-making, by learning what works and what does not.
full time equivalent
(équivalent temps plein): A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person year charge against a departmental budget. Full time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
gender-based analysis plus (GBA+)
(analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS+]): An analytical process used to help identify the potential impacts of policies, Programs and services on diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people. The “plus” acknowledges that GBA goes beyond sex and gender differences to consider multiple identity factors that intersect to make people who they are (such as race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability).
government-wide priorities
(priorités pangouvernementales): For the purpose of the 2018–19 Departmental Plan, government-wide priorities refers to those high-level themes outlining the government’s agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government; A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada's Strength; and Security and Opportunity.
horizontal initiatives
(initiative horizontale): An initiative in which two or more federal organizations, through an approved funding agreement, work toward achieving clearly defined shared outcomes, and which has been designated (by Cabinet, a central agency, etc.) as a horizontal initiative for managing and reporting purposes.
non budgetary expenditures
(dépenses non budgétaires): Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance
(rendement): What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
Performance indicator
(indicateur de rendement): A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
Performance reporting
(production de rapports sur le rendement): The process of communicating evidence based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
planned spending
(dépenses prévues): For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts presented in the Main Estimates.
A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.
plan
(plan): The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally, a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
Priority
(priorité): A plan or project that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Departmental Results.
Program
(programme): Individual or groups of services, activities or combinations thereof that are managed together within the department and focus on a specific set of outputs, outcomes or service levels.
Program Alignment Architecture Footnote 19
(architecture d’alignement des programmes): A structured inventory of an organization’s programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.
results
(résultat): An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.
statutory expenditures
(dépenses législatives): Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
Strategic Outcome
(résultat stratégique): A long term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization’s mandate, vision and core functions.
sunset program
(programme temporisé): A time limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.
target
(cible): A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
voted expenditures
(dépenses votées): Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.
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