Quality of western Canadian mustard 2013

This report presents information on the oil, protein and glucosinolate content and the fatty acid composition of oriental (Brassica juncea), brown (Brassica juncea) and yellow (Sinapis alba) mustard grown in western Canada in 2013 (Figure 1). The data was obtained from analyses of harvest survey samples collected by the Canadian Grain Commission.

Figure 1 – Mustard crops grown in Canada
Mustard samples clockwise: yellow, oriental, brown. Latin names in text above

Summary

Mean fixed oil content for the top grade of all types of mustard in the 2013 harvest was higher than the 10-year mean (2003-12): oriental (44.9% versus 41.9%); brown (39.5% versus 39.1%); and yellow (32.3% versus 30.2%) (Figures 2, 3 and 4). Mean crude protein for the top grade of all types of mustard was: oriental (24.2% versus 26.6%); brown (26.3% versus 26.8%); and yellow (29.5% versus 31.8%), compared to the 10-year mean for each crop (Figures 2, 3 and 4). Glucosinolate content in the top grade of oriental mustard was 108 micromoles per gram, 18 micromoles per gram lower than the 10-year mean. Meanwhile, glucosinolate content in the top grade of brown mustard was 96 micromoles per gram, 13 micromoles per gram lower than the 10-year mean (Figure 5).

Contact

Bert J. Siemens
Chemist, Oilseeds Services, Grain Research Laboratory
1404-303 Main Street
Winnipeg MB  R3C 3G8
Telephone: 204-984-6991 or
Toll-free 1-800-853-6705
Fax: 204-983-0724
Email: bert.siemens@grainscanada.gc.ca