Quality of Canadian oilseed-type soybeans 2015

Weather and production review

Weather review

It was a challenging growing season for producers. In the west, warmer weather allowed an early seeding however there were two cold spells in May (mid and end of May) due to freezing temperatures and snow that delayed seeding. Some acreages seeded with canola ended up seeded with soybeans after the second re-seeding. Temperatures were higher than normal for most of the growing season allowing soybean to mature. There were some pockets of heavy rain in Manitoba that might have affected the crop but overall the crop was in good conditions. Harvest was able to proceed in spite of the heavy rains in September.

March and April were cooler than normal in the east part of Canada but May was about 3°C warmer than normal. June and July saw the return of lower than normal temperatures with warmer than normal temperatures returning in August and September. Precipitation was variable, dry with some heavy precipitations in some areas, particularly in some areas of Québec in May and June in Ontario.

Sources:

Ontario crop report

Manitoba crop report

Saskatchewan crop report

Canada weather maps

Production and grade information

Since 2007, soybean production in Canada keeps increasing (Figure 1). In 2015 the soybean production increased from 6.0 million tonnes in 2014 to 6.235 million tonnes (Table 1). The production increased in all provinces (Table 1) + 25% in Manitoba, + 11% in Québec and + 10% in Saskatchewan, except in Ontario where a 5% decrease was observed. This was partially due to an increase in seeded area in Manitoba (+ 9%) and an overall yield increase compared to 2014 (2,900 kilograms per hectare in 2015 versus 2,700 kilograms per hectare in 2014). The yield increase was very significant in Québec + 23% (3,200 kilograms per hectare in 2015 versus 2,600 kilograms per hectare in 2014) and Manitoba + 14% (2,500 kilograms per hectare in 2015 versus 2,200 kilograms per hectare in 2014), and in Saskatchewan + 6% (1,700 kilograms per hectare in 2015 versus 1,600 kilograms per hectare in 2014).

Figure 1. Soybean production in Canada from 2000 to 2015

Graph: Soybean production in Canada from 2000 to 2015

For the 2015 soybean survey, we received 225 samples, 113 from the East and 112 from the West (Table 2). All harvest survey samples submitted to the Canadian Grain Commission from all locations (Ontario, Québec, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, Manitoba and Saskatchewan) were graded by Canadian Grain Commission inspectors according to the Official Grain Grading Guide. In the 2015 survey, 99.1% of the submitted samples were in the top 2 grades. The very few samples (0.9%) that were graded Soybean, No. 3 Canada and lower were from the east.

Table 1. Seeded area and production for eastern and western Canadian soybeans
Province Seeded area ProductionFootnote1 5-year average production
2015 2014 2015 2014 2010-14
hectares tonnes tonnes
Manitoba 560,500 514,000 1,390,700 1,107,700 601,720
Saskatchewan 109,300 109,300 179,600 163,300 23,680Footnote2
Western Canada 669,800 623,300 1,570,300 1,271,000 625,400
Ontario 1,173,600 1,242,400 3,592,500 3,791,100 3,130,860
Québec 315,000 348,000 1,000,000 898,000 768,600
Prince Edward Island 21,900 26,300 47,200 60,100 47,040
New Brunswick 5,300 6,100 12,200 13,600 8,000
Nova Scotia 4,500 4,900 12,800 14,800 7,700
Eastern Canada 1,520,300 1,627,700 4,664,700 4,777,600 3,962,200
Total Canada 2,190,100 2,251,000 6,235,000 6,048,600 4,587,600

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Statistics Canada. Table 001-0010. Estimated areas, yield, production and average farm price of principal field crops, in metric units.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

Statistics Canada started to report Saskatchewan soybean production in 2013, 2013 and 2014 production date were 118,400 and 163,300 tonnes, respectively. To calculate the 5 year average, in 2010, 2011 and 2012 Saskatchewan production was assumed to be 0.

Return to footnote 2 referrer